CPD23 Thing 13: Google Docs, Wikis and Dropbox

Thing 13 post

Google Docs

I’ve been using Google Docs at work for nearly three years and it’s really revolutionised the way I do my job. That sounds a bit dramatic but the role has changed so much since we adopted it!

Partly that’s down to the Guardian becoming a more digital, interactive product. Partly it’s because I’ve become involved in the Datablog, which is powered by Google spreadsheets of data. But it’s also made existing jobs easier.

Before, when the department was working on a project together, we would compile info in an Excel spreadsheet or Word file. It would sit in someone’s public folder, but we’d enable it for multiple users and as long as you were in the office you could amend it.

Quite often though, the spreadsheet wouldn’t like being updated by two people at once and would crash, or create multiples, and someone would have to go in and fix it.

When the work was complete, we’d have to email the spreadsheet to the editor or journalist who’d requested the work, or move it to their folder, so that they could work on it. If they decided they needed to change the format or needed a different dataset, they’d send it back and we’d start again.

Now, project spreadsheets sit in Google Docs. They’re shared with everyone in the department, who can actually really genuinely update them at the same time without causing problems. We can share them with any writers or editors who need them, too, and everyone can access them from anywhere, even (though we don’t want to encourage working after hours!) from outside the office.

If the end product is a graphic or interactive, it can feed directly off the spreadsheet in Google Docs, so any updating can be done in real time and seen immediately on the page (like this Afghan casualties interactive, or one we did for 9/11 a few weeks ago). The Datablog feeds off Google spreadsheets for most of its content (this Man Booker Prize 2011 one is my latest baby).

The future is spreadsheets. No, really.

Dropbox

Because I already use Google Docs, and because I can’t download software at work, I’m going to skip Dropbox for now (sorry Dropbox).

Wikis

When I attended CILIP’s Umbrella conference a few months ago the most practical nugget I came away with was to adopt a wiki at work, as a way of sharing knowledge between colleagues (thanks Alan Brine and the wiki the67things).

We’ve tried a few ways of sharing department ‘how to…’s, but never hit on a formula that everyone likes and, more importantly, that everyone uses and contributes to. At the moment we use Google Docs, which works fine as document storage, but is clogged up with all our other docs. I think a wiki is the answer, so this is a great opportunity to try it out.

Unfortunately, to use MediaWiki you have to download the software, which I can’t do, so I had a go with PB Works instead. I set up an account – researchandinformation - and had a wander round to figure out the navigation. It’s not as intuitive as some software these days, but it’s easy to create pages, and hopefully I’ll be able to add it to the arsenal of tools we use in the office.

Reflections

Google Docs is always going to win out over Dropbox for me, because it is already central to my working life and because you don’t need to download any software to use it.

I’m determined to set up a wiki for use at work but I’ll need to speak to the rest of the department before I go off all gung ho. There’s no point adopting a new resource only for others to ignore it (which has happened previously with Delicious). I’m pretty sure there’s software already available within the company which doesn’t require download (can you tell that annoys me?), but if not PBWorks will suit what we need.

I’ll continue to use existing wikis for career development – I take part in Library Day in the Life and I’m going to add myself to the Library Routes project. For now, this blog serves me well for recording my Chartership path, but I’m using a Google Docs spreadsheet to list CPD activities, and when I come to compiling my portfolio I’m sure I’ll use it more!

Like I said, spreadsheets are the future.

About these ads

One thought on “CPD23 Thing 13: Google Docs, Wikis and Dropbox

  1. Pingback: CPD23 Thing 19: Bit of a breather | Librarian of tomorrow

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s