#Libday8 Day two (31 January)

Library Day in the Life round 8

Senior researcher, Guardian News & Media (news library)

  • 8.45am: Caught up on Twitter on the bus in to work, and read a couple of really interesting #libday8 posts and articles (see below for links)
  • 9.30am: I had a journalist query waiting in my inbox when I logged on –  looking for a quote from Hansard (the House of Commons record). There’s an easy-to-use archive on the parliament.uk website which goes back to 1988, and there was a possible date (we like!) but it wasn’t the right one. I searched by MP on Hansard but couldn’t find the quote for that year’s session, so I checked our text archive and Google for the article referenced in the email, to see if I could gather any more info. This led me to a new date (1994), but you can’t search that far back by MP so I headed to the advanced search instead. I should have tried there first! Nothing came up when I searched for the keywords. I even whacked the quote into Google but no joy there either. I’ve asked the journalist for more information. And it seemed so simple…
  • 10.30am: Our trainee maintains a spreadsheet of casualty figures from Afghanistan which feeds into a Datablog post on British dead and wounded. I’m responsible for updating the running total in the article and relaunching it with an amended table when wounded figures are released. The spreadsheet also includes amputation figures, released quarterly by the MoD through DASA. They’re out today, and normally our trainee Nina will just copy over the new figure and tot up the annual total, but the MoD have changed their methodology so now they’re reporting amputations by financial year. This, and the fact that they don’t report quarterly figures less than five, means our annual totals no longer tally with the official MoD numbers. I’m loathe to switch to financial year (“there were xx amputations in 2010” is nicer journalistically than “there were xx amputations in 2010/11”) but as it stands our annual data is incomplete. I’ve added an explanatory note to the spreadsheet but I’m going to consult the Datablog editor to decide whether we should switch to the financial year rather than Jan-Dec.
  • 11am: Still working on the Hansard query! The journalist has provided the source of the quote (a pressure group report), so I’ve got more to go on – it seems the quote may not have been said in the House. I checked Google in the first instance, and the writer thought it may have been from the Diana inquest but I can’t find it. I’ve admitted defeat and contacted the House of Commons information office.
  • 12pm: We’ve decided to include both the Jan-Dec and financial year totals for amputations in the Datablog figures, so Nina and I amended the spreadsheet and added a note to explain discrepancies.
  • 12.15pm: Amended the table of wounded data attached to the Datablog post on British casualties and relaunched the article.
  • 1pm: My job share, Lauren, worked on a crowdsourcing Datablog post about people who have refused honours a few weeks ago, and a reader has emailed with some new information, so I added it to the spreadsheet.
  • 1.30pm: Proper lunch break – there’s a charity cake sale on by the canteen today so I treated myself to a slice of cherry loaf, yum.
  • 2.30pm: Panic over regarding the missing quote, the journalist has located it himself (a bit embarrassing!).
  • 2.30pm: Working on From the archive, the ‘on this day’ series that we publish online (with a piece printed in Saturday’s Guardian comment pages). Found two too-long pieces for the end of Feb (Mickey Mouse in 1935 and trials of using computers in 1986) which need trimming.
  • 4pm: Journalist query – tracking down a Guardian article from the 1990s – pulled together a few possibles from the text archive and Factiva.
  • 4.30pm: Graphics wanted some help finding military stats for an interactive, so I borrowed the Military Balance and photocopied the relevant pages. A bit tedious but much preferable to typing it all out!
  • 5.25pm: A quick one to finish – a PDF of an Observer spread from a fortnight ago (from the text archive).
  • 5.30pm: Leaving on time for the first time in a long time. Sounds like a country song.

Read today: The engine of serendipity, a 2006 post from Nicholas Carr’s Rough Type blog (via @lilianedwards); Jonathan Franzen : e-books are damaging society in the Telegraph; Save Our Libraries campaign one year on from the Guardian Books blog (via @SimonXIX); Library Day in the Life day one by Nicole Brock at Odd Librarian Out; Library Day in the Life part 2 by Tina Reynolds.

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3 thoughts on “#Libday8 Day two (31 January)

  1. Thanks for reading about my day and commenting! I’ve been neglecting my blog for so long, I’m glad to see some activity again. Your day sounds pretty interesting! I always thought it could be fun to be a news/media librarian. Never a dull moment, or so it would seem!

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